Hogeschool Rotterdam Willem de Kooning Academie

Book Launch THIS LITTLE ART

Book Launch THIS LITTLE ART

All are welcome to celebrate THIS LITTLE ART by MFA core tutor Kate Briggs, published by Fitzcarraldo Editions

There will be a short reading + books + drinks! 

Date: Friday October 6th, 2017
Time: 6 – 8 pm
Location: large project space, Piet Zwart Institute, Karel Doormanhof 45, 3012 GC Rotterdam. 

Praise for THIS LITTLE ART:

‘Kate Briggs’s This Little Art shares some wonderful qualities with Barthes’s own work – the wit, thoughtfulness, invitation to converse, and especially the attention to the ordinary and everyday in the context of meticulously examined theoretical and scholarly questions. This is a highly enjoyable read: informative and stimulating for anyone interested in translation, writing, language, and expression.’

— Lydia Davis, author of Can’t and Won’t

‘In This Little Art, Kate Briggs looks at the “everyday, peculiar thing” that is translation, testing it out, worrying at its questions. She deftly weaves her recurring threads (Roland Barthes, Crusoe’s table, The Magic Mountain, aerobic dance classes) into something fascinatingly elastic and expansive, an essay – meditation? call to arms? – that is full of surprises both erudite and intimate, and rich in challenges to the ways we think about translation. And so, inevitably, to the ways we think about writing, reading, artistry and creativity, too. As a translator, I’m regularly disappointed by what I read about translation – it feels self-indulgent, irrelevant in its over-abstraction – but This Little Art is altogether different. It comes to its revelations through practicality, curiosity, devotion, optimism, an intense and questioning scrutiny, as the work of a great translator so often does.’

— Daniel Hahn, translator of José Eduardo Agualusa and winner of the International Dublin Literary Award in 2017

‘Though it does not present itself as a memoir, a how-to guide, or a scholarly monograph, [This Little Art] derives its magic precisely from being all of these and more: gifting us not only with a genre-bending work of imaginative criticism, but also a fitting metaphor for all that the work of translation is, and can be.’

— Theophilus Kwek, Asymptote