Hogeschool Rotterdam Willem de Kooning Academie

Piet Zwart Institute

Piet Zwart Institute

Date: Saturday February 11, 2017 Time: 10:00-19:00 Location: Master Fine Art Piet Zwart Institute, Karel Doormanhof 45 Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Coinciding with the WdKA/PZI Open House, the Master Fine Art at the Piet Zwart Institute is pleased to announce STUDIOS OPEN!, an occasion during Art Rotterdam week for visitors to meet emerging artists in their studios and engage directly with them about their practices.

In addition to opening their studio doors to you, the MFA artists will present their work in two group exhibitions in the Karel Doormanhof building.

Featuring: Timur Akhmetov, Sophie Bates, Shraddha Borawake, Connie Butler, Katharina Cameron, Larisa David, Angelica Falkeling, Marta Hryniuk, Alexander Iezzi, Tor Jonsson, Ash Kilmartin, Anne Kolbe, Johanna Kotlaris, George Nesbitt, Anni Puolakka, Collette Rayner, Nicholas Riis, Erika Roux, Victor Santamarina, Anastasia Shin, Eothen Stearn, Viktor Timofeev, Nicholas Thomas, Daniel Tuomey, Sophie Varin.

Date: Saturday February 11, 2017 Time: 10:00-19:00 Location: Master Fine Art Piet Zwart Institute, Karel Doormanhof 45 Rotterdam, the... Lees verder

Date: February 22, 2017. 18.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free

Point Supreme’s stubborn commitment to reality ends up in the production of accurate and constantly updated lists of things including all sort of elements: islands, chairs, fruits, animals and mountains. These visual lists operate at all scales, making no difference between rooms and cities, trees and forests, stones and mountain ranges. Point Supreme’s lists combine interiors and exteriors, public and private, geography and architecture. Within these lists different scales are combined in order to describe the contemporary metropolitan condition: subjects move in the cities followed by their personal collection of objects and public spaces are the product of the accumulation of these different personal collections. The city described by Point Supreme seems to be made of innumerable components. Public and private spaces have no clear boundaries within these careful lists: the house is a museum and the museum is a house, the table is a public space and islands are tableware (expert from Systematic Surrealism by Pier Paolo Tamburelli in ‘Athens Projects’, Graham Foundation, Chicago 2016)

Point Supreme was founded by Konstantinos Pantazis and Marianna Rentzou in 2008 after working in London, Rotterdam, Brussels and Tokyo. Point Supreme regularly publishes self-initiated studies and projects for Athens, the city where they are based. Their research and projects for the contemporary city was exhibited in the Greek Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2012. That year they were included by popular Greek newspaper LIFO among the 20 most influential personalities in Greece. They are currently nominated for the Iakov Chernikhov Prize and are included in Wallpaper* magazine’s Architects Directory for 2015. ‘Athens Projects’, the first book dedicated to their work was published as part of the Treatise Series in 2015 by Graham Foundation in Chicago.

http://www.pointsupreme.com/content/

 

Point Supreme, Totems, Pavillon De L’ Arsenal, Paris, 2017, photo by Yannis Drakoulidis

 

Date: February 22, 2017. 18.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free Point Supreme’s stubborn commitment to reality... Lees verder

In 2016, the WdKA Research Prize was extended to not only include outstanding bachelor projects, but also exceptional work from the Master programmes. Moving away from the convention of research being solely conducted through writing a thesis, this award honours the research of artists, designers, and educators in its entirety. Research, in this context, is understood to encompass a broad scope of methodologies and a range of forms, such as visual work, installations, sonic and haptic pieces, campaigns, networking, writing, and performance. It also includes a breadth of possible orientations across autonomous, social and commercial creative practices. This year the jury based its decision on the preliminary criteria of originality, criticality, links between theory and practice, accuracy, clarity, crafts, storytelling and context awareness in the nominated projects. Carefully reviewing all of the nominees research, the jury decided to split the award between two projects which, seen next to each other, exemplify the diversity of artistic research and its potential. They are also excellent examples of autonomous and social artistic research practices respectively.

Tracy Hanna (Master Fine Art) “Can’t quite come to terms with perms” and a reflective text “Tingling”

“Tracy Hanna’s body of research consists of an installation, “Can’t quite come to terms with perms”, and a reflective and explorative text entitled “Tingling”. The installation combines crafted ceramic sculptures, video, pigment, with found elements, such as a fire extinguisher or a light switch, to create a lyrical grammar between various figurative elements and the space itself. Much like the installation a similar approach has been taken in her writing. Hanna, who graduated from the Master of Fine Art programme, continues her research into the sensual and visceral by reusing other artists’ writing, both in style and content, and turning her thesis into an artwork. It is a piece whose self-reflexiveness can be deceptive because the writing might be drawn from another source. Parasitic and appropriative writing has a long tradition in modern and contemporary art (from the Dadaists to Kathy Acker’s postmodernism to Kenneth Goldsmith’s contemporary Uncreative Writing), which the thesis acknowledges through its bibliography. As a whole, the jury found this a compelling, coherent, well-executed work of artistic research. The installation and writing were complementary, both sharing commonalities in content and approach, and at the same time showing a strong sensitivity to what each medium makes possible.”

Mascha van Zijverden (Master Education in Arts) “Recrafting Craft: A Synergy of Crafts within Fashion Design Education at Art Schools in the Netherlands”

“Mascha van Zijverden’s research on “Recrafting Craft: A Synergy of Crafts within Fashion Design Education at Art Schools in the Netherlands”, a graduation project in the Master Education in Arts, had proven its value for the professional field even before the jury reviewed it. Van Zijverden characterizes the contemporary fashion system as “broken” because of unmet challenges in social innovation, sustainability and digital manufacturing. This analysis is widely shared in the field, supported through findings of major Dutch fashion researchers and further backed up by van Zijverden’s excellent field research on the Dutch and British fashion systems. In her project, Mascha Van Zijverden’s networked key players of the fashion system. In a series of workshops with fellow educationalists and students, visions of the “future fashion professional” and “craft as fundament for change” were collectively developed. The jury found Mascha van Zijverden’s project extensive in its scope and careful in its execution. As a classical piece of practice-oriented research, it found its validation in the professional field for which it was made.”

In 2016, the WdKA Research Prize was extended to not only include outstanding bachelor projects, but also exceptional work from the Master... Lees verder

Date: February 8, 2017. 18.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free

From the first written records of design analysis until the recent past, the discussion of design has revolved around the relationship of form, function, and interpreted meaning. Meanwhile, material was seen as something neutral that merely awaited the application of a formal idea. This can be observed in the lag between the development of a new material and the discovery of its potential: for example, in architecture, the Greek stone temples echoed elements of wood construction, and cast iron structures originally took the motifs of stone carving. Form had its own development and momentum, often independent from that of material. This legacy carries on in some “iconic” buildings and products; the form is the central reference, the message of the work. This lecture suggests a different narrative in which design begins from the properties and transformations of “raw” material.

Several points will be examined:

How did the philosophical and scientific discoveries of the Enlightenment change the way people looked at and altered material? How can the effects of these scientific discoveries be read in design prototypes and architectural examples of the 20th century? How did post-minimalism or the Fluxus movements in art contribute to this new investigation into material? How are the new heroes of architectural/design philosophy (Deleuze & Guattari/Manuel de Landa/James Gordon) championing the energetic potential of material over the arbitrary superficiality of form in design? How are contemporary designers engaging in this dialogue with material in different ways, crafting an idea in the material/energy (that is, the medium) itself?

Tamar Shafrir is a writer and designer based in Rotterdam. She works as a design researcher at Het Nieuwe Instituut and a lecturer on design and critical writing at the Design Academy Eindhoven and the Sandberg Instituut. Her writing has been published in magazines including Domus, Volume, Dirty Furniture, Disegno, and MacGuffin, as well as books including Printing Things, Open Source Architecture, SQM: The Quantified Home, and Symbolic Exchange. In 2013, she co-founded the studio Space Caviar with Joseph Grima in Genova. Their projects have been exhibited at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, Vitra Design Museum, V&A, and Istanbul Design Biennial.

Image: Pol Bury, “Monument dédié à 12 000 billes”, 1971

Date: February 8, 2017. 18.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free From the first written records of design analysis... Lees verder

Opening Tuesday 31st January 6pm-8pm 1st Floor, Karel Doormanhof 45

Also open 6pm-8pm Wednesday 1st – Thursday 2nd February.

“I am not interested in real time and also not in the dramatic and codified time of cinema that manipulated duration. Let’s say I take ‘my time.’” — Chantal Akerman

I set myself the goal to make interesting images within the restrained space of my room and using the visual material of my daily life. Not really knowing what I was searching for, I let the camera be an intruder into my intimacy, through a choreography between recording tool and myself. The video is a collection of moments, try-outs, improvisations of sound and moving images.

The Free Shop is a space for exhibition-making, experimentation and speculation outside of an academic framework. The space is programmed by Sophie Varin and Nick Thomas. Thanks to VSR and PvdK.

Opening Tuesday 31st January 6pm-8pm 1st Floor, Karel Doormanhof 45 Also open 6pm-8pm Wednesday 1st – Thursday 2nd February. “I am not... Lees verder

Little history of the Camera

This talk looks into the history of the camera from the 1840’s onwards within the context of the rise of smartphone sales’ and consequent decrease in standalone camera sales, , thus revealing the ongoing process of technological obfuscation. This pattern of blackboxing what in reality is a simple mechanism, besides naturalizing cultural and social biases, stiffles evolution and prevents the reappropriation of this technology by a wider group of individuals.

Date: Tuesday 31 January, 2017 Time: 17:00 location: Het Atelier, Nieuwe Binnenweg 77, [old CBK building] [other Punch Clock events, daily at 17:00]

Wed 1 Feb: Momo’s Typo’s A crash course in automatic writing on vintage mechanical typewriters, based on a concept by Momo Bouchtaoui.

Thu 2 Feb: Serge Onnen – It’s Always Darkest Before it Becomes Totally Black/live version The artist brings his installation to life with a talk and some animation and music by a Chinese artist from the Rotterdam area.

Fri 3 Feb & Sat 4 Feb: Teatro Dondolo – Nausea A poetic-scientific performance, a live documentary about the sea visualised by means of shadows, projections and reflections.

free admission, Fri 27 to Tue 31 Jan, 18:00-20:00, Peter Kubelka presents: Bread, Butter and other Metaphors after the Punch a Clock              

Little history of the Camera This talk looks into the history of the camera from the 1840’s onwards within the context of the rise of... Lees verder

Time: Thursday February 2nd, 12.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free

Koen Deprez (Kortrijk, 1961 – ) graduated in 1984, from what was then the St. Lukas School of Art and Architecture in Brussels. He subsequently collaborated with OMA (Rotterdam) and Studio Alchimia (Milan) and, enriched by these academic and professional experiences, began developing his passion for landscapes, interiors and urban spaces – a preoccupation of his since the early 1980s. Deprez explores these dislocated and imposing environments via drawings, collages, architecture, isometries and interventions, and even through an educational curriculum. Although Deprez trained as an interior architect, the two most decisive moments in his career took place beyond the walls of the architecture school. One of them was the army.

Important exhibitions: Storefront for Art and Architecture, New-York – Museum voor Sierkunst, Ghent – Musée Horta, Brussels – Provinciaal Museum, Hasselt – Sint-Lukasgalerij, Brussels – Museum of Finnish Architecture, Helsinki – Nietzsche Archive, Weimar – Kunsthal, Rotterdam – Deutsches Architectur-Museum, Frankfurt a/Main – Gammel Dok, Kopenhagen – Fundaçao das Descobertas Lisbon – Norton Gallery of Art, West Palm Beach – Grande Arche, Paris-La Défense – Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam – SMAK, Gent – Lokaal 01, Breda – Center for Architecture, New-York – ETH, Zurich Scientific assistant at the KU Leuven, faculty of Architecture (Brussels)

www.galeriezwarthuis.be

https://vimeo.com/194884435

Time: Thursday February 2nd, 12.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free Koen Deprez (Kortrijk, 1961 – )... Lees verder

A LECTURE ABOUT MAKING, PERSONAL STORIES, UNKNOWN RELATIONSHIPS, UNEXPECTED EXPERTS, SERIOUS JOY

Time: Wednesday January 18, 18.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free

Ernst van der Hoeven is an art historian, landscape artist and publisher. In 2002 he established EVDH, studio for the urban landscape. With his Amsterdam based studio he designs landscapes, curates exhibitions and makes works of art. In 2008 he co-founded the indie zine Club Donny a journal on the personal experience of nature in an urban environment. In 2015 he and Kirsten Algera started the biannual design & crafts magazine MacGuffin, in which they explore the life of things. He is a (guest)lecturer at The Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam and the Design Academy in Eindhoven.

Kirsten Algera is a writer, design historian and publisher based in Amsterdam. In the last ten years she worked as a freelance critic, writer, curator and documentary maker for different platforms, most notably the Dutch Broadcast Company VPRO and the Dutch Council for Culture. Algera initiated various international design projects and is a (guest) lecturer at different design schools like Bilgi University Istanbul, Design Academy Eindhoven and the University of the Arts in Utrecht. Her latest project is a design & crafts magazine that she founded in 2015 with Ernst van der Hoeven: MacGuffin.

MacGuffin Magazine is praised in international reviews as an ‘imaginative, impeccably researched and irresistible’ biannual, the European Design Award winning magazine features extraordinary stories about the life of ordinary things. Each edition takes an object and explores the manifold stories it generates. Like the Macguffins in Hitchcock films, these things are not the main characters, but the objects that set the story in motion.

www.macguffinmagazine.com

A LECTURE ABOUT MAKING, PERSONAL STORIES, UNKNOWN RELATIONSHIPS, UNEXPECTED EXPERTS, SERIOUS JOY Time: Wednesday January 18, 18.00hrs Location:... Lees verder

m.m.m.

– media, models and metaphors –

Each year, the Department of Media Design & Communication at the Piet Zwart Institute co-operates with The International Film Festival Rotterdam in organising an intensive day of mini-masterclasses around one of the IFFR theme programs

This year some of the most distinguished thinkers and practitioners in the field of film, visual art and media archaeology will articulate their personal viewpoints on the interaction between media and the human mind.

As Friedrich Kittler once remarked: ‘We knew nothing of our senses until media provided models and metaphors.’  But to what extent do we actually acknowledge this metaphorical implication of the media that control our daily lives?

The conference is part of the IFFR exhibition and film programme Nuts & Bolts. With its trans-historical focus on image technology this programme deals with the ways in which artists have dismantled and reassembled the conventions of cinema—screen, projection, darkness—to reactivate the debate regarding the apparatus in the age of new media.

Working against the rhetoric of technology as progress and promise, the artists in Nuts & Bolts recalibrate technology and its effect on mediation. They modify obsolete cinematic techniques to develop alternative interfaces that produce moving images. Their media archaeology is in many ways a follow-up to the critical attitude of filmmakers from the seventies who, inspired by Foucault’s notions of the apparatus and the dispositif, questioned and deconstructed both the technological and ideological constellation that we submit ourselves to, while watching a film.

The artists in Nuts & Bolts enter into a dialogue with the history of media, paradoxically through the design of new technological dispositifs. Each prototypical contraption engages the amazed viewer in a specific way. Their installations and performances are laboratories for self-reflexive research on our cultural responses to an image.

 

Date: Monday, January 30th Programme:

[doors open at 10:00]

10:15 > 11:00 : introduction by Simon Pummell (Piet Zwart) & Edwin Carels (IFFR)

11:00 > 12:00 : Patrick Bokanowski on the mindset behind his methods of image making

12:00 > 12:45 : Siegfried Zielinski on Arab automata

12:45 >13:30 : lunch break           –

13:30 > 14:15 : Andrew Lampert on his project  ‘Don’t Loose the manual’

14:15 > 15:00 : Patricia Pisters : on her new research project on cinema, metallurgy,  alchemy

15:00 > 15:30 : coffee break  + Screening PROJEKTOR

15:30 > 16:15 : Wim Janssen and Dušica Dražić on their ‘Projektor’ project

16:15 > 17:30 : Peter Kubelka – Bread, Butter and other Metaphors

17:30 > 18:30 : concluding drinks

 

Location of the Symposium & the Nuts & Bolts exhibition

Het Atelier (former CBK) – Exhibition

Nieuwe Binnenweg 77, Rotterdam

Artists represented in the Nuts & Bolts exhibition:  Guillaume Bijl, Jason Dee, Wim Janssen & Dušica Dražić, Honoré d’0, Peter Kubelka,  Andrew Lampert, Guy Maddin, Julien Maire, Serge Onnen, Mathijs van Oosterhoudt,  Brothers Quay, Joost Rekveld, Teatro Dondolo, Sarah Vanagt, Floris Vanhoof.

The exhibition runs from Thursday 26 until Saturday Feburary 4: Open daily from 11:00 – 20:00

For the full Nuts & Bolts programme, see www.iffr.com

 

Image: ‘Projektor’, Wim Janssen and Dušica Dražić, 2017 

 

 

 

m.m.m. – media, models and metaphors – Each year, the Department of Media Design & Communication at the Piet Zwart Institute... Lees verder

a lecture by Carolyn Strauss

Time: Thursday December 8, 17.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free

This lecture will introduce an expanded field of inquiry and experimentation that is the work of Slow Research Lab, a multidisciplinary research platform based in the Netherlands.  The work presented—traversing the fields of architecture, art, material research, and urban design—offers alternative visions and variant rhythms for reflecting upon and (re-)imagining the spatial, relational, and temporal potentials of a complex, interdependent world. The lecture intend to awaken new understandings, challenge comfort zones, spark curiosity and debate, and incite further investigation of ‘Slow’ approaches to living, now and into the future.

Carolyn Strauss (US/NL) is a researcher, curator, and creative facilitator whose work traverses the fields of architecture, design, contemporary art, emerging technology, and social theory. She is interested in enabling spaces of inquiry and encounter through which an expanded realm of human potential is explored and developed, with a particular focus on creative practice as a catalyst for dialogue and new experiences. As director of Slow Research Lab, Strauss has engaged a network of thinkers and creative practitioners in a myriad of research-based programs, including collaborations with prominent museums, cultural organizations, and academic institutions. She regularly lectures, writes, and curates study experiences that share both the cumulative work of the platform and her own personal Slow understandings. She lives and works in Amsterdam.

Slow Research Lab http://slowlab.net

a lecture by Carolyn Strauss Time: Thursday December 8, 17.00hrs Location: Wijnhaven 61, Room 4.320, 4th floor Admission: Free This lecture will... Lees verder